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Teaching educators to teach values

This paper was presented at the Distance Education and Teacher's Training in Africa (DETA) 2007 Conference, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. Literature would seem to suggest that higher education, among other things, is about values (Payne, 2002; Atwell, 1996; Waller, 1991; Hastings Centre, 1980). Some authors, like Kirschenbaum (1994) and the Hastings Centre (1980), suggest that the higher education concern about values had atrophied over last 100 years under the pressure from the scientific and research hegemony that saw teaching as conveying value-free theories, facts and modes of enquiry. Many academics argue, often convincingly, that values have no place in the higher education classroom, and that teaching practices must be oriented, as much as possible, towards disinterestedness, allowing students to make their own uncoerced choices (Joy, 1996) regarding how they should conduct their lives. This, I belief, is impossible as all human interactions are saturated with messages of what people value or not and we are constantly, overtly or covertly through our total behaviour, sending value messages. Moreover, a pedagogy divested of moral purpose is empty and meaningless (cf. Nieuwenhuis, 2007; Joy, 1996; Payne, 2002; Kirschenbaum, 1994).

Author:
Jan Nieuwenhuis
URL:
URL
Conference:
Distance Education and Teacher Education in Africa DETA Conference 2007
Date:
2007
Education Quality    Higher Education    teacher education   

 
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